Category Archives: Competition

Artwork images – record or new art?

Artwork images are not as easy to photograph as they seem.

Artwork images are not as easy to photograph as they seem.
Image of paper art by Peter Gentenaar
More from this artist on: http://www.gentenaar-torley.nl/  Artwork images: Link to Peter Gentenaar | External link - opens new tab/page

Artwork images are sometimes questionable as art

Most photographers look at work by an artist they like and feel compelled to take a picture. Of course it serves to remind them of the art they saw. That is reasonable. The keen photographer thinks differently. They like to see the artwork. They also like to produce photographic art of their own. But more often than not the picture they take is actually a record shot.

It is often said by judges in photographic competition that a sculpture photograph is a record shot. I have said it myself when judging. A pure record is not a piece of art by the photographer. Just exactly what do we mean by that?

Artwork images: Record verses interpretation

An example of a record shot is the photo at the top of this article. This work is by the wonderful paper artist Peter Gentenaar. His work is stimulating and interesting to the eye. Photos of his work bring out the splendour of his art. That is the point. They are less about the photographers interpretation of the art. Instead, they are about repeating the work in its fullness to show the work itself. It is a record. As such, it will show off the skill of the original artist.

Record shots are a legitimate photographic form. But they are often a  record of the exhibit - not new photographic artwork images in their own right.

Record shots are a legitimate photographic form. But they are often a record of the exhibit – not new photographic artwork images in their own right.

(Sol LeWittWall Piece (16 Modules High),
1988Painted wood,
76 x 5 x 5 inches
Edition size: 20
Published by Edition Schellmann, Munich and New York. Artwork images: Sol LeWitt: Wall Piece | External link - opens new tab/page)

Reproduction of artworks in a record style is a proper photographic form. For remembrance, or sales purposes, it is fine. For those seeking to make their own art there is something more needed than simply snapping someone else’s work.

That something extra is a new re-interpretation of the work. The photographer has to invest something of their own into the picture. They have to make more of the original artwork than is presented solely by the work itself. There are a number of ways to do this.

A new interpretation may not be a complete image of the work. It may include the full work, or only be a part of it. The environment of the image, how it is presented, or its framing are all important. Overall there will be something in the new artwork images that the photog makes their own.

 

How can you make new artwork images from an art piece?

Abstract from a piece of art

In this abstract of another piece by Peter Gentenaar the photographer has not shown the whole piece of work. They have taken a piece of the work that shows the wonderful lines and curves, but as a whole it creates a taste for seeing more.
See: Peter Gentenaar–Paper Magician Artwork images:  | External link - opens new tab/page.

• Abstract artwork images: One way to get something new out of a piece of art is to create an abstract of some sort. Abstract photos can be deeply satisfying to create and provide an interesting image for the viewer to consider. Most of the time abstracts are about making an image of a part of the artwork. An example is shown on the left. There can be a lot more to creating abstract photos than simply framing a bit of the total. The power of abstract is to create the essence of the total.

Abstracts require an eye for what works when the whole is not seen. For more on abstracts see our Abstracts Resources Page.

• Creating an new environment: The environment where sculptures are displayed is often important to the sculpture. Sometimes images are still record shots even if they are not on a simple white background. This link is an example of a Henry Moore sculpture record shot (Author unknown).. The author has displayed the sculpture just as it is with little enhancement. In fact it is almost devoid of its environment. The sky serves only as a backdrop.

The same could be said of this picture of an elephant sculpture (below). The artist has created a superb piece which mimics the body of an elephant defying gravity. The first shot is a pure record shot. But, the second is a superb interpretation of the sculpture in it entirety with an audience, depersonalised by movement blur. Very clever. Both images are taken by the sculptor himself, Daniel Firman. A simple but excellent reinterpretation. Such re-inventions are in themselves artistic. As such they are creating artwork images in their own right.

Gravity-Defying Elephant Sculpture

Gravity-Defying Elephant Sculpture by Daniel Firman.
Images by Daniel Firman.

Published in: Gravity-Defying Elephant Sculpture.
(Seen on WordlessTech Artwork Images: Gravity-Defying Elephant Sculpture by Daniel Firman | External link - opens new tab/page 29/05/2015).


Another Henry Moore Sculpture is shown below. This image makes as much of the environment as the sculpture. The artist has created a great panoramic picture using a letter-box crop. The length of the principle subject (the sculpture) is complemented by the almost central position. But, it is highlighted by the mundane, but important line of sheep. The latter gives the eye an excellent weighted contrast to the sculpture in the background. Clever compositional devices like this often create great great artwork images. There is no way this is a record shot.
Artwork images: The compositional devices in this image make it an interesting example.

The compositional devices in this image make it an interesting example of artwork images – definitely not a record shot.
(Seen on: Backstrap Weaving Artwork Images: Henry Moore sculpture on Backstrap Images blog. | External link - opens new tab/page.
(Click the image to see full size).

• Adding something: Another way to make something new of a piece of art is to put something new into, or onto, the piece. I leave the artwork images to your imagination here.

I have often heard judges say about record shots, of say a sculpture, “this needs your hat on it”. Alternatively they might say something like, “a cat just here would make the image something different”. What the judge is saying is, the author has created a shot that does not have anything from the photographer in the image. Whereas, with a little thought, or a little prop, or even a person – the picture could be transformed. Instead of the simple (and boring) representation, the author could have added that little extra that makes the image into a reinterpretation – something different. It would be something created uniquely by the photographer.

Works by you are artwork images

The uniqueness of a photograph is something that makes photography interesting. But, make the main subject a simple representation of somebody else’s work, then the uniqueness is lost. A simple record is created. But with simple compositional thoughts, re-frameing, or the addition of some new aspect, you create a new synthesis. One that is unique to you. One that is a real contribution to the body of artwork images. That is what makes photography so special.

The main point to take from this is simple. Think, plan and consider the composition when taking pictures of other peoples art. A subtle treatment of the art piece can transform it into an image only you could make.

Artwork images – further thinking

Which of these are record shots of Henry Moore Sculptures and which are artwork images by the author…
Henry Moore sculpture on Google Images Artwork images - further thinking | External link - opens new tab/page

Comments, additions, amendments or ideas on this article? Contact Us
or why not leave a comment at the bottom of the page…

Like this article? Don’t miss the next — sign up for tips by email.

Damon Guy - Netkonnexion

Damon Guy (Netkonnexion)

Damon is a writer-photographer and editor of this site. He has run some major websites, a computing department and a digital image library. He started out as a trained teacher and now runs training for digital photogs.
See also: Editors ‘Bio’.
By Damon Guy see his profile on Google+.

A mixed bag of lens knowledge – lens quiz answers

A range of Lenses - get the lens quiz answers here

A range of Lenses • On Photokonnexion we give away knowledge – Today we give the lens quiz answers.

Answers to the Lens Quiz…

The lenses quiz a few days ago supplied links to interesting resources on Photokonnexion. Here is all that knowledge in one post. Check your answers. Enrich your knowledge! We are generous with facts!

Lets get started!

Lens quiz question 1. Why do you use a lens hood?
A lens hood helps to prevent light from entering the lens at a sharp side-angle which is likely to cause lens flare. An occurrence of flare can create ugly artefacts on the image.

Lens quiz question 2. Name the phenomenon that causes light to bend when it hits a lens surface?
Refraction…
When light passes through a surface into a new medium it is refracted. The phenomenon that causes light to bend on entering a new medium is refraction.

Lens quiz question 3. How does the optical path differ from the optical axis?
The optical axis is an imaginary axis of rotation for the symmetry of the lens. A perfectly round lens can be rotated about the axis and not change its image in any way.
The optical path is the path light follows through the camera.
The optical path coincides with the optical axis through the lens. On entering the DSLR camera body, if the mirror is down, the light is directed up to the pentaprism and reflected through the viewfinder, into the eye. It is in this case the path of the light differs to the optical axis.
If the mirror is up light coming through the lens will strike the surface of the sensor. This path also coincides with the optical axis.
The optical path stops at the sensor. The axis of rotation theoretically passes through the lens and the sensor and out of the back of the camera.

Lens quiz question 4. What is another name for an individual glass lens inside a photographic lens?
Each single glass optical lens in a photographic lens is an “element”. In any one photographic lens there may be any number of lenses, some forming groups.

Lens quiz question 5. Is the focal length of an optical lens the same as the focal length of a photographic lens?
No…
Focal length measures the power of an individual optical lens. It measures how much the lens bends light. The point where bent light intersects with the optical axis of the lens is the focal point (in the case of a convex lens). The distance from the focal point to the centre of the lens is the focal length of a lens (measured in millimetres).
A photographic lens uses a number of elements to create an image. The focal length is measured from the image. The centre of the photographic lens is deemed to be the centre of the array of elements that make up the lens. So, the focal length is measured from the sensor to the centre of the elements that make up the photographic lens.

Lens quiz question 6. How many lenses in a lens group?
A photographic lens can have as many elements and element groups as appropriate to achieving the designed purpose of the lens. The design dictates the number of lenses and lens groups required.

•  Theoretical Lens diagram • Theoretical lens layout showing elements and groups.

Click image to view large
Generalised photographic lens layout showing showing the principle features.

Lens quiz question 7. Describe what “chromatic aberration” looks like in a picture.
Most often a chromatic aberration is a slight rimming of colour(s) around brightly coloured objects. Sometimes it is barely visible.

Lens quiz question 8. What is projected onto the sensor plane from the lens?
The image. The sensor plane is a flat plane which is the surface of the sensor. The image from the photographic lens is projected there. The light energy hitting the sensor is converted to electrical signals and stored as an image file.

Lens quiz question 9. What is the diaphragm in a photographic lens?
Somewhere within the body of a photographic lens is an internal “wall” which crosses the path of the light. It has a hole in the centre. This allows light to pass through to the camera from the lens. This wall is called the diaphragm. It also supports the iris that creates the variable sized gap called the aperture.

Lens quiz question 10. Can the focal length be greater than the measured length of the lens body?
Yes…
Very long focal lengths make very long lenses. Some would be unwieldy to use. Many consumer DSLRs have 200mm focal length lenses but the whole lens often measures less than 200mm. This is because the combination of certain elements creates an “effective” focal length. We refer to elements mimicking a true focal length as “telephoto” elements and they create a class of “telephoto lenses”. Telephoto elements do lower optical quality. Modern engineering makes the images acceptable.

Lens quiz question 11. What would you normally use a macro lens to do?
To take photographs of very small things. The macro lens projects an image onto the sensor at a ratio close to 1 to 1. This is normally printed at a much larger size therefore giving the impression that there has been a magnification of the object. In fact macro lenses rarely actually magnify. The correct name for a lens that enlarges beyond 1 to 1 is a photomicrographic lens.

Lens quiz question 12. Does a wide aperture have a low ‘f’ number or a high ‘f’ number?
A wide aperture is indicated by a low ‘f’ number. As the ‘f’ number goes up the aperture gets smaller.

Lens quiz question 13. Is the shutter in the lens or the camera?
It depends on the camera. DSLRs normally have the shutter right next to the sensor, in the camera body. The cost of putting shutters in all interchangeable lenses would increase the price, weight and size of lenses.
However, shutters are slow physical mechanisms. So in fixed-lens cameras (bridge cameras and point-and-shoot cameras) the shutter is in the lens. It is smaller and therefore faster, and is cheap since you only buy it once.
Medium and large format cameras have large digital ‘backs’. Shutters would be very slow for such large sizes. A slow shutter makes many types of exposures impossible – e.g. action shots. So the shutter is in the lens where the light beam is thinnest.

Lens quiz question 14. Which is the fastest lens an f1.2, f5.6 or f4.0?
A fast lens is one that lets lots of light in allowing short shutter opening. The fastest lenses have the widest apertures. A low ‘f’ number indicates a wide aperture. So F1.2 would let the most light in. Thus, the f1.2 would be the fastest lens.

Lens quiz question 15. What controls the depth of field?
Aperture.
A lens can only resolve light to a sharp image at one point. Sharpness drops off either side of that point. The depth of field is the zone of acceptable sharpness (to the eye) either side of the sharpness point. However, as a lens uses a wider and wider aperture its control of sharpness deteriorates making the zone of acceptable sharpness shallower.
You get a deeper depth of field with a small aperture. But small apertures restrict the incoming light requiring slower shutter speeds to get the same exposure.

It’s what you learned in the lens quiz that counts

I know you got some of these right if you have been reading Photokonnexion for a while. If you got them all right then well done. Even more well done to those who read around my links and learned new things. As in most things in life it is not what you know that takes you forward, it is what you are prepared to learn that counts.

Comments, additions, amendments or ideas on this article? Contact Us
or why not leave a comment at the bottom of the page…

Like this article? Don’t miss the next one.
Sign up for tips by email.

find out more...Photokonnexion tips by email
If you enjoyed this article please sign up for our
Tips by email service.
                                                 Find out more

Damon Guy - Netkonnexion

Damon Guy (Netkonnexion)

Damon is a writer-photographer and editor of this site. He has run some major websites, a computing department and a digital image library. He started out as a trained teacher and now runs training for digital photogs.
See also: Editors ‘Bio’.
By Damon Guy see his profile on Google+.

A quiz about lenses… what do you know?

• Lenses • Lens quiz

• Lenses •

Lenses are a wide ranging subject…

and there is a lot to know. It is very easy to make mistakes. So finding out the basics is important. In this lens quiz I will give you the links to resources so can find the simple answers which is also essential information… have fun!

Lens Quiz Questions…
  • Q1. Why do you use a lens hood?
  • Q2. Name the phenomenon that causes light to bend when it hits a lens surface?
  • Q3. How does the optical path differ from the optical axis?
  • Q4. What is another name for an individual glass lens inside a photographic lens?
  • Q5. Is the focal length of an optical lens the same as the focal length of a photographic lens?
  • Q6. How many lenses in a lens group?
  • Q7. Describe what “chromatic aberration” looks like in a picture.
  • Q8. What is projected onto the sensor plane from the lens?
  • Q9. What is the diaphragm in a photographic lens?
  • Q10. Can the focal length be greater than the measured length of the lens body?
  • Q11. What would you normally use a macro lens to do?
  • Q12. Does a wide aperture have a low ‘f’ number or a high ‘f’ number?
  • Q13. Is the shutter in the lens or the camera?
  • Q14. Which is the fastest lens an f1.2, f5.6 or f4.0?
  • Q15. What controls the depth of field?
Where to find the answers…
Answer sheet

You can download a copy of an answer sheet so you can write the answers while looking at web pages.

Our answers…

We will give you our answers on Monday 05th August 2013. In the meantime, have fun!

Comments, additions, amendments or ideas on this article? Contact Us
or why not leave a comment at the bottom of the page…

Like this article? Don’t miss the next one — sign up here.

Damon Guy - Netkonnexion

Damon Guy (Netkonnexion)

Damon is a writer-photographer and editor of this site. He has run some major websites, a computing department and a digital image library. He started out as a trained teacher and now runs training for digital photogs.
See also: Editors ‘Bio’.
By Damon Guy see his profile on Google+.

find out more...Photokonnexion tips by email
If you enjoyed this article please sign up for our
Tips by email service.
                                                 Find out more

Lenses and designations? Confused? An easy guide

• Lenses •

• Lenses •
Buying lenses optimised for your sensor is confusing.

Lenses are a big investment…

It is difficult to know which lens is optimised for your digital image sensor. There seems to be so many different designations. Here is a guide to which lens designation you want.

Explaining the differences

Brands like Canon and Nikon have their own lenses range. Third party manufacturers, like Sigma, Tokina and Tamron etc. manufacture lenses for brands like Nikon, Canon and others. if buying lenses the third party manufacturers have lenses which are equivalent to the Camera brand manufacturer or possibly better. Look around at online reviews to see what standard of lenses and prices are available.

Make sure you buy lenses fitted with the correct lens mount for your camera. Older models of cameras may have the correct mount but some of the more recent lenses might not be suitable to work with the camera. So check the mount and camera are compatible before buying.

Why are lens mounts specific to brands? It’s mainly historical – the development paths of the manufacturers differ. However, they also want their customers to stay loyal to the brand. This unfortunate situation means you have to reinvest in a new range of lenses if you change your camera body. Hmmm! Expensive.

There are two types of camera sensor. There are cropped sensors – which is a small size. These are more often referred to as APS-C format.

The other sensor format is full frame sensor. These are the size equivalent of the old film SLR frames on a roll of film.

Full frame digital sensors are less common than cropped sensors. The cropped sensors are easier and cheaper to manufacture. However, in recent years we are seeing an increase in full frame releases of new cameras. The higher resolution (more pixels) and potentially bigger print sizes are attractive to consumers. As full frame format gets cheaper they are likely to become more common.

The full frame sensor size is the same size as a 35 mm (36mm ×24mm) film frame in old SLR cameras. Because of the historical significance of the 35mm format modern DSLRs are based on the same standard. Lenses are normally designed to fit either the full frame format or the cropped format.

Lenses designed for the full frame sensor have an image circle that covers the whole 35mm sensor. These lenses tend to be more expensive because they need a wide circle of light thorough them to cover the sensor. They have bigger glass elements as a result.

Full-frame sized lenses are able to fit a camera with the same mount and a cropped sensor. The image circle from the lens remains constant. The smaller sensor size (APS-C) is therefore only able to process the light from the centre of the circle – the rest of the light spills over the side of the sensor. The resultant photograph is like a zoomed-in crop of the image that would have otherwise been taken with a full frame sensor.

This image-cropping effect of smaller sensors is known as the “crop factor”. It represents the ratio of the size of the full-frame 35 mm sensor to the size of the smaller format. The apparent zooming effect also gives rise to an alternative name – the “focal-length multiplier”.

The ratio of full-frame to crop tends to lie in the range 1.3–2.0 for most cropped sensor DSLRs. You might say that a 100 mm lens on a camera with a 1.5 crop factor creates an apparent zoom multiplying the focal length by 1.5. A 100mm lens would then appear to produce the same picture as a 150mm lens. This is not a true magnification since the focal length of the lens is the same on both cameras. Instead the cropped sensor is likely to produce a lower quality result than than the full frame sensor while revealing a closer result.

You can use lenses designed for full frame sensors on cropped sensors. It does not work the other way. A lens designed for a cropped sensor creates an image circle smaller than the full-frame sensor. It would create a circular image with very strong vignetting around the sides. Manufacturers recommend not using lenses designed for cropped sensors on full frame cameras.

Designations

To ensure that buyers purchase the correct lenses for full frame or cropped sensor manufacturers designate them with specific marques. Here is the breakdown of the most common designations…

 Manufacturer  Full frame
(and APS-C)
 APS-C
(cropped)
    Canon           EF pEF-S
    Nikon          FX DX
    Sigma          DG DC
    Tokina          FX DX
    Sony     Various‑incl.
3rd party mounts
DT
    Tamron          Di Di-II
    Samsung   Not available‑2013 NX
    Pentax Check manufacturer
specification
DA
  Konica‑Minolta Check manufacturer
specification
DT
Other related sources…

Lens manufacturers (Wikipedia) External link - opens new tab/page
Photography equipment manufacturers (cameras, lenses etc) (Wikipedia)  External link - opens new tab/page

Comments, additions, amendments or ideas on this article? Contact Us

find out more...Photokonnexion tips by email
If you enjoyed this article please sign up for our
Tips by email service.
                                                 Find out more

By Damon Guy (author and Photokonnexion editor)

Damon Guy - Netkonnexion

Damon Guy (Netkonnexion)

Damon is a writer-photog and editor of this site. He has run some major websites, a computing department and a digital image library. He started out as a trained teacher and now runs training for digital photogs.
See also: Editors ‘Bio’.
By Damon Guy see his profile on Google+.

Can you write? Of course you can!
Write for Photokonnexion...

We would love to have your articles or tips posted on our site.
Find out more…
Write for Photokonnexion.

Do you find it difficult to photograph art?

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5345/8977458941_2c55c81a0e_o.jpg

• The World Is A Different Place When Viewed Through Art •
Click image to view large
The World Is A Different Place When Viewed Through Art By Netkonnexion on Flickr External link - opens new tab/page

It’s all about interpretation…

We all have a little difficulty photographing art. We know that interpretation is important to the success of a piece – have we got the interpretation right? Should we hesitate when shooting art by others? Analysis paralysis could stop us doing anything. My view is we have to give it a try.

When photographing art there are two broad approaches. One way is to create a record shot which tries to represent the art as seen. You are producing a sort of factual postcard representation. The other is to take the shot putting your own interpretation on the piece.

Both these approaches are legitimate.

Some general points…

As with all photography there are some general principles that need to be established. In a nutshell we should try to…

  • Declutter the scene so the eye goes to the subject
  • Make sure our subject is the main focus of the shot
  • Ensure we have a clear purpose for the shot
  • Work hard to remove distractions (eg. bad focus or burnt out highlights)
  • Treat the subject with complementary light to bring out its best features

…these help us to ensure that we are conveying the meaning of our shot to our viewers.

The purpose

Clarity of purpose for a shot is an important part of crystallising our idea about how to present it. If we make a conscious decision about why we are taking the shot, it will help us to make the distinction between a record shot or an interpretation.

A judge at a photography competition once told me, “you should never put a picture of a piece of art in a competition unless you have put your own mark on the piece of art”. “Otherwise,” he said, “it is a record of someone else’s art”. For a judge that’s important. If it is a record of someone else’s work, what has he got to mark that is yours?

So, with photography of art I think you need a clear idea about your intentions. A record shot is about preserving the piece, ensuring that it’s essence is retained.

That judge I mentioned told a story. His friend was passionate about public art – pieces on public display in the open air. He travelled widely photographing sculpture. He always had something with him that he put on the sculpture. A scarf. A hat maybe. Sometimes a teddy bear. The strategic placement of that one thing was enough to add a new meaning. It was a sort of reinterpretation. The judges friend was creating a new work of art.

This clarity about “representation verses interpretation” comes up in many aspects of photography.

Often beginners are not aware of its significance. That is the reason there is often “something missing” in their pictures. The pictures of beginners often look sterile because they have tried to represent reality. The standard of their photography is not good enough to make the picture stand out. The picture itself is insipid because it lacks interpretation.

When someone has an artistic eye, even if a beginner, the interpretation they bring to a shot trumps the lack of technical skill. That is why some artists can create great images within a short time of first handling a camera. They know how to create an event in the imagination of the viewer – even if they lack the skill to create a great photograph. That event is the image that stays with the viewer.

Making the difference

Once we have established the purpose of the shot we should have a clear idea about some of the things that we can do to actually make the image…

Record shots: You are looking to create a clear, technically excellent representation. Work on sharp outlines and clear colours which are as close as possible to the original. Try to capture any essential textures, but also try to show the piece in its entirety. You will probably need to take a regimented progression of shots to do this. Typically a good record shot is one of a series. Record the full detail of the piece, capture it from all sides. Try not to embellish or exaggerate. Make a plain statement of its existence. Use plain light. However, if you only have time for one shot then make it as faithful to the original as possible.

Interpretation shots: You can let your imagination run wild. Anything goes. You are doing it to express how you feel about this piece. Get your feelings out there, exaggerate, magnify, close in, show it all or just enough… wild angles, odd views. You get the point. You are making the shot yours. You are doing some thing different.

Photographing art is one example

The principle of “expression versus representation” runs right through photography. Natural history shots are a case in point. We want our pictures of birds to be essentially record shots. We are looking for a faithful record of them. The trick with wildlife is to show them performing some behaviour which is peculiar to them.

You can probably think of other examples of the way this split affects your shots.

Once you become aware of this essential tension within every shot you can begin to work on the imagination or the representation in your own area of interest. It is critical to conveying meaning in your shot.

By Damon Guy (author and Photokonnexion editor)

Damon Guy - Netkonnexion

Damon Guy (Netkonnexion)

Damon is a writer-photog and editor of this site. He has run some major websites, a computing department and a digital image library. He started out as a trained teacher and now runs training for digital photogs.
See also: Editors ‘Bio’.
By Damon Guy see his profile on Google+.

Can you write? Of course you can!
Write for Photokonnexion...

We would love to have your articles or tips posted on our site.
Find out more…
Write for Photokonnexion.

Easter Competition results

• Competition Pictures •

• Competition pictures •
Spot the difference between the two pictures…

Easter spot the difference competition…

On the Easter weekend we ran a spot-the-difference competition for prizes. You had to find the differences between the two pictures. Today we announce the results.

And the winner is:
Mike Gifford – congratulations Mike… a winning prize of a £30 Amazon voucher (or equivalent currency value) will be winging its way to you shortly.

And the two runner up prizes go to…
Ann LeFevre and Chelle Caldwell. Congratulations to you both. Well done! The runner up prizes of one £10 Amazon voucher each (or equivalent currency value) will be on their way to you soon.

Thanks very much to the competition winners for entering. Thanks to everyone else who entered.

If you want to look over the differences between the two full sized pictures, here are links links again…

• Workshop A • By Netkonnexion on Flickr External link - opens new tab/page

• Workshop B • By Netkonnexion on Flickr External link - opens new tab/page

Spot the difference answers

Changes to picture A
1. Head gasket moved from off the wall
2. Two nails removed from board next to the tyre
3. Green tin missing from bottom shelf under the lamp
4. Words removed from body of the vise
5. Handle removed from lath under the window
6. Easter egg on the floor under the anvil
7. Handle removed from vice in foreground left next to tyre
8. The word “of” (white letters) removed from the window.
9. Orange and white tin removed from bench next to grind wheel
10. Bottom Arm of the blue lamp is removed.

Changes to picture B
1. Man removed from window
2. Spanner on the wall changed
3. Screwdriver/tool removed from top of box on vise
4. Chuck removed in foreground (in the middle of the tyre)
5. ‘Castrol’ logo removed from oil can under the lathe
6. The word “straps” removed from the top yellow Dunlop box
7. Spout removed from Red-x tin (shelf top right of window)
8. Oil filter removed from hanging on window wall rack
9. Easter egg under bench RHS
10. Two stripes removed from the BP flag on the bench

Click to have a look at the original competition page.

By Damon Guy (author and Photokonnexion editor)

Damon Guy - Netkonnexion

Damon Guy (Netkonnexion)

Damon is a writer-photog and editor of this site. He has run some major websites, a computing department and a digital image library. He started out as a trained teacher and now runs training for digital photogs.
See also: Editors ‘Bio’.
By Damon Guy see his profile on Google+.

Easter competition… two days to go – still time to win Prizes!

• Competition pictures •

• Competition pictures •
Spot the difference between the two pictures…

Spot the difference competion…

Over Easter we ran a simple spot-the-difference competition for prizes. Compare the pictures (full versions on the competition page). Pick out fifteen differences (from a total of twenty). You could be a winner!

Want to know more?

Just click here and have a look at the pictures… simple!